About Love

As I was lying next to my daughter as she fell asleep this afternoon for her nap I was thinking about the nature of love.  Most specifically I was thinking about the love I have for my children and the love I have for my husband and how they are different.  I came up with this analogy; it is imperfect but it does pretty well. 

My love for my children is like titanium.  It is incredibly strong:  can’t be dented, broken, chipped, crushed, or otherwise damaged.  My love for them will never diminish and nothing can make the love come apart (which is not to say that I will always like them or like their behavior, just that I will always love them.)  This love is simply a fact and there is not a lot of need to monitor and baby it along.

On the other hand, my love for my husband is gold.  It is strong but can be dented, changed, mutated.  And a strong enough force can actually break or melt it.  So it is important to take care of spousal love, to protect it and polish it and keep it safe.  Just one more way of saying that having children should not take all of my focus – my husband gets some, too.

So, just the two of us went out to dinner and talked and ate and laughed.  Then home again to the children feeling a bit more like beloved and loving adults than just harried and impatient parents.  Ah, love in all its forms, ain’t nothing else like it.

Love of food, too...

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3 Responses to About Love

  1. Erin Fough says:

    Lovely post. Very true about working on spousal relationship/love. We too often think children should take all precedence, but they will be much happier if the marriage is healthy and whole than if it is sacrificed due to neglect.

    • You are right, children do get most of the attention as they demand and need it by their very nature. But they do better when the partnerships they are exposed to are good, live, active ones rather than neglected, dead ones. They are little, not stupid, and can scent unhappiness a mile away. And anyway, when they are grown up and move out what’s left if you didn’t nurture your spouse and that relationship?

  2. Jim McPhee says:

    That photo of me is not me loving food, but me using food to prevent my pic from being taken. Basically, it goes, “Quit it, or get mustarded!”

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